Installing Haskore (Haskell/CSound) under FreeBSD

I’ve spent most of today looking at Haskore, which appears to be the most well-developed kid on the block for doing Csound type things using Haskell (and indeed, doing music type things using Haskell). Here are my notes on finding/installing it, which experience wasn’t completely straightforward…

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Autoattach / automount encrypted home partition in FreeBSD using GBDE

I’ve just set up one of my laptops, running FreeBSD, so that /home is encrypted using GBDE, and is auto-attached/mounted/fsck’d at boot time. The instructions in the FreeBSD handbook aren’t completely clear, so here are some notes on how I did it.

Actually, most of those instructions are very clear, provided you don’t care about attaching at boot time. Indeed, I’ve had an encrypted partition which I attach/detach by hand, for about a year now, for which those instructions were perfectly adequate. Unfortunately, the section on “Automatically Mounting Encrypted Partitions” leaves out two important details which conflict with the rest of the chapter: your lock file’s name needs to end in the text “.lock”, and you need to be careful where you put it. This was confusing, and in some ways what you have to do to get automounting working contradicts the other examples in the chapter.

Anyway, long story short, I had to dig into /etc/rc.d/gbde to work out what had to be done, and here it is… A summary of how to set up an auto-attaching encrypting home partition on FreeBSD using GBDE:

(I did this as pretty much the first thing after a fresh install, before I’d even created any users. Needless to say, then, all of this happens as root.)

Here’s how /etc/fstab looked before I started:

# cat /etc/fstab
# Device        Mountpoint         FStype    Options   Dump Pass#
/dev/ad0s1b     none               swap      sw        0    0
/dev/ad0s1a     /                  ufs       rw        1    1
/dev/ad0s1e     /tmp               ufs       rw        2    2
/dev/ad0s1f     /usr               ufs       rw        2    2
/dev/ad0s1g     /usr/home          ufs       rw        2    2
/dev/ad0s1d     /var               ufs       rw        2    2
/dev/acd0       /cdrom             cd9660    ro,noauto 0    0

Unmount /home because I’m about to blat it completely:

# umount /usr/home

Create a directory to contain the lock files:

# mkdir /etc/gbde

Initialise the partition for GBDE. I used a use sector size of 2048 (which matches the UFS fragment size). Note that the lock file’s name ends in .lock; this is not how the main body of the GBDE instructions in the handbook does it, but it’s necessary to get /etc/rc.d/gbde to attach it properly on boot up:

# gbde init /dev/ad0s1g -i -L /etc/gbde/ad0s1g.lock
Enter new passphrase:
Reenter new passphrase: 

Attach the encrypted partition to the kernel for the first time (entering the passphrase previously specified), and write the filesystem:

# gbde attach /dev/ad0s1g -l /etc/gbde/ad0s1g.lock
Enter passphrase: 
# newfs -U /dev/ad0s1g.bde 
/dev/ad0s1g.bde: 6632.5MB (13583360 sectors) block size 16384,
                 fragment size 2048 using 37 cylinder groups of
                 183.77MB, 11761 blks, 23552 inodes.  with soft
                 updates
super-block backups (for fsck -b #) at:
 160, 376512, 752864, 1129216, 1505568, 1881920, 2258272, 2634624,

*SNIP*

Test the mount:

# mount /dev/ad0s1g.bde /usr/home

Assuming that looks good (eg in df), unmount it and detach it:

# umount /usr/home
# gbde detach /dev/ad0s1g

Now we’re ready to set it up for auto-attaching. We need to alter /etc/rc.conf and /etc/fs.tab

# tail -n 3 /etc/rc.conf
gbde_autoattach_all="YES"
gbde_lockdir="/etc/gbde"
gbde_devices="ad0s1g"

We need the gbde_lockdir line because otherwise it looks for the lock files just in /etc, I think.

# grep home /etc/fstab
/dev/ad0s1g.bde /usr/home          ufs       rw        2    2

Now when I boot, it asks for the passphrase, attaches the encrypted partition, and mounts it – automatically – then it gets fsck’d with everything else. It doesn’t automatically detach upon halting the system, but I guess that’s no problem. :-)

The only thing I don’t totally like is that if I get the passphrase wrong (3 times), it doesn’t attach or mount the encrypted partition (obviously), but then of course it fails filesystem checks completely and the boot process dumps down to single user mode, messily. Not completely unreasonable, I guess, but still a bit annoying.

Anyway, anyone now stealing my (crappy) laptop will have a much harder time of getting at the data on it (the interesting data, anyway). Whee!

wmii FreeBSD and xmms plugins (in ruby)

A few days ago I started using wmii, with Mauricio Fernandez’ ruby scripting magic, and oh it’s fun.

The status bar monitors that come in Mauricio’s code don’t work for me, however, because I’m running FreeBSD not Linux, and things like uptime and battery status get report differently. Also, there wasn’t any xmms control/monitoring. I have now fixed both of these problems, and invite others to partake of the goodness.

So: wmii-freebsd@gimbo.org.uk.rb – a ruby/wmii plugin defining status bar monitors which work under FreeBSD.

And: wmii-xmms@gimbo.org.uk.rb – a ruby/wmii plugin defining an xmms status bar monitor, and some key bindings for simple control of xmms (play/pause; next; previous; forward 5 secs; back 5 secs; toggle shuffle; er, that’s it).

Status bar screenshot:

ruby wmii freebsd/xmms status bar monitors

From left to right: xmms monitor displaying track name, time elapsed, shuffle status (“>” is normal, “@” is shuffle); current master volume; the “-N-” is a standard plugin so I say nothing here; temperature and CPU speed; load averages; uptime (h:mm); battery status and time remaining; date/time.

Comments, suggestions, bugfixes, criticisms of my appalling ruby code all welcome.

Gaah, I’m tracking STABLE, but should probably be tracking security… :-/

Nice explanation of FreeBSD release versions.