How to disable underscore subscript in TeX mode in emacs

After some random recent upgrade, emacs started doing something annoying: when in TeX mode (eg when editing LaTeX docs, which I do a lot), it would treat every underscore in the document as a signal that the next symbol should be subscripted, and display it as such: the character would be offset vertically using font-lock magic. This is very annoying, because underscore only means subscript in maths mode; the rest of the time, it’s wrong and silly to visibly subscript the thing. In general, I don’t want emacs to do such semi-WYSIWYG-ness – syntax highlighting is about as much as I need, thank you.

Anyway, how to turn it off is non-obvious, and required several increasingly imaginative google search strings. In the end I came across this recent thread on gnu.emacs.help, one of whose posts suggested that turning down font-lock-maximum-decoration from “maximum” is the right thing to do. Yep, that works: I changed it to “nil” and now I’m happy.

Why the iPhone puts Java into the past tense (apparently)

In Which I Think About Java Again, But Only For A Moment [smallcool].

Me, I defected long ago. I’m another of those Apple Java engineers who dropped out. I spent five years as a raving Java fanboy, but I gave up after optimizing AWT, implementing drag and drop, and trying to make 1,200 pages of crappy APIs do the right thing on the Mac. Then I took a one-week Cocoa training course, and wrote the first prototype of iChat.

Desktop Java never worked because Sun tried to build their own OS on top of the real OS, duplicating every API and feature. This led to terrible bloat, making every app as heavyweight to launch as Photoshop. Worse, the GUI portions of the Java platform are awful, because Sun is a server company with no core competency at GUIs. The APIs are too clumsy to code to, and compared to any decent Mac app, the results look like a Soviet tractor built on a Monday.

He almost makes me want to get a Mac, ditch BSD and emacs, and start writing Cocoa apps – except that then life would just be too darn easy, and I’d never hear the end of it from TR (or Bash, probably).

It’s always somewhat depressing, or at least downheartening, to see someone like this tell me I shouldn’t be using emacs. It always makes me wonder if, maybe, they’re right – maybe out there there’s an editor that’ll do everything emacs does for me, but somehow nicer, more productive. Usually, as far as I can tell, that means the editor does IDE-like things such as autocompletion, code browsing, etc. – and yes, that’s stuff I just don’t use when coding. But gosh darn it, I’ve tried a lot of editors and nothing has ever come close, for me, to the feeling of power and (welcome) flexibility emacs gives me. Effortlessly editing multiple files in multiple split views in multiple windows (across multiple virtual desktops), powerful and easy regexp and macro capabilities, and (as one of the commenters on the linked article says) just doing The Right Thing with indentation in Python, Java, C, Haskell, … So the downheartening aspect is the tantalising feeling that there’s something else out there I should be using, but I just can’t find it! Of course, not using a Mac probably doesn’t help me, here. ;-)

I haven’t listened to Depeche Mode for a while, mind…

Oh, and here‘s another “Java is rubbish” story (comparing EJB lines of code with python/django) from the same source.