Arrows in JavaScript

Arrows in JavaScript.

Arrows generalise computation schemes from the sequential version provided by monads, and are thus hard to bend one’s head around. It’s interesting to see them in JS.

Monads and the meaning of imperative language – also, some musing

Monads and the meaning of imperative language — the delicious alpheccar does a lovely job of introducing denotational semantics without saying enough to scare you off, and shows how exceptions (or even assert) in imperative languages are, at bottom, the Maybe monad. This point generalises (apparently – I know enough to believe it could be true, but not enough to assert that it isn’t untrue) to “any formal description of control flow in an imperative language will be monadic in nature.” Gorgeous.

The stuff about defining domains (and that being the hard part) is resonating with me just now; I’ve spent the day nailing down definitions of sets describing a particular aspect of my pet specification language, CspCASL, and it’s not trivial. And this is the easy part: not proper “domains”, just sets without much internal structure. Markus does that, for the model semantics. Anyway, yay language design.

Formally describing languages is hard. That’s why it doesn’t happen much yet, which is one reason our current languages situation is so messy. My hand-waving prediction: it’s hard but not intractable, and we’re getting better and better at it; in time it’ll be a sufficiently managable problem, with sufficiently good tool support, that languages which aren’t formally described will stagnate in comparison to the new languages then appearing. Naturally, from where I’m standing I see the increasing convergance of computer languages (sounds like a dumbing-down term but I’m really just trying to cover both programming and specification) with full-blown mathematical logic in all its various and colourful forms. Mathematics is the language for describing things formally; a computer program is by necessity a formal description of something, therefore this convergance seems like it will be a good thing – again, from where I’m standing. Whether or not it appears that way because where I’m standing is a good place to get a view of what’s going on, or just because that’s all you can see from here, remains to be seen. ;-)

The Catsters

The Catsters — twenty category theory lectures on Youtube. Looks like they start with monads. Also: ++cute lecturer ftw! Aha, it’s Eugenia Cheng. Lucky Sheffield.

The Joy of Grothendieck

A name I’ve come across in my work on hets is Grothendieck. In a great example of Wikipedia cascade, someone on #haskell this morning mentioned the programming language Joy (which looks pretty cool), which led to the page on monoids, which led to the page on Grothendieck groups, which led to the page on Grothendieck himself, who a) also looks cool, and b) “gave lectures on category theory in the forests surrounding Hanoi while the city was being bombed, to protest against the Vietnam war”. Respect.

RMS in lego

I just found two super photos on flickr…

More super for computer people, I guess, but anyway…

(Number 2 in an ongoing Thorsten series.)

Haskell and Category Theory

An introduction to Category Theory from a Haskell point of view. As always, monads are where your brain starts hurting.

Foozles!

Yikes. This is waaaaay too close to home: Foozles – a programming language feature comin’ atcha soon! [wadler]

2013: Francoise Boisbleu proves that under a certain formulation, Foozles are a categorical dual to Aspects, which gets everyone terribly excited.

It certainly would.